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November 30, 2012

Every night before bed 21- year old Jori LaVoy washes her face, brushes her teeth and then proceeds to do something that few other college students do- she takes first of 13 pills to control her ulcerative colitis.

 

For many students, college is an important first step in growing up, experiencing freedom and learning how to manage one’s time. For LaVoy, however, that transition was made much harder when she was diagnosed with a severe case of ulcerative colitis during the fall of her junior year.

 

November 30, 2012

Every night before bed 21- year old Jori LaVoy washes her face, brushes her teeth and then proceeds to do something that few other college students do- she takes first of 13 pills to control her ulcerative colitis.

Every night before bed 21- year old Jori LaVoy washes her face, brushes her teeth and then proceeds to do something that few other college students do- she takes first of 13 pills to control her ulcerative colitis.
 
For many students, college is an important first step in growing up, experiencing freedom, and learning how to manage one’s time. For LaVoy, however, that transition was made much harder when she was diagnosed with a severe case of ulcerative colitis during the fall of her junior year.
 

November 30, 2012

I just want to say right up front, that this subject is not really up my alley … or across my street, down my road or next door at the house that sits empty although we hear noises there all the time, either; or at least, I hope not.
But, as I debated about writing my thoughts on Measure B, I decided that as a journalist, I need to be able to write about most anything; even if this particular hoopla seems absolutely ridiculous to me. So here goes:

November 14, 2012

Courtney Davis, clinical assistant professor of pharmacy practice at The University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC), is working to improve diabetes patients’ care through a national, multi-site program called Project IMPACT: Diabetes.

Courtney Davis, clinical assistant professor of pharmacy practice at The University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC), is working to improve diabetes patients’ care through a national, multi-site program called Project IMPACT: Diabetes.

The purpose of the program, funded by the American Pharmacists Association Foundation, is to implement better diabetes care in areas that need it the most, like the Mississippi Delta.

November 12, 2012

The tone of the “political” get-together on campus Tuesday night was far too serious for my taste — we all should have been dancing.

October 25, 2012

Students walking through the Quad this week might notice something unusual.
The University of Mississippi student organization SistahSpeak! has dyed the water in the Phi Mu fountain pink in support of individuals affected by breast cancer.

Students walking through the Quad this week might notice something unusual.
The University of Mississippi student organization SistahSpeak! has dyed the water in the Phi Mu fountain pink in support of individuals affected by breast cancer.

About 50 people attended an event held yesterday at the fountain in the center of campus to kick off the week-long dying of the fountain.
“We wanted to do this to not only support people affected by breast cancer, but
to raise awareness on campus,” vice president of SistahSpeak! Danielle Bean said.

October 8, 2012

As both flu season and finals are fast approaching, Director of the Student Health Center Sandra Bentley encourages University of Mississippi students to seek vaccinations to guard against illness.

As both flu season and finals are fast approaching, Director of the Student Health Center Sandra Bentley encourages University of Mississippi students to seek vaccinations to guard against illness.

October 4, 2012

When most of us think of October, we think of crisp mornings in the Grove, the pumpkin patch on the Square, vibrantly colored leaves, amusing festivals and a plethora of happenings occurring in the area. All of these things bring joy to my day. October is filled with packed days, events and deadlines.
Along with the hustle and bustle of October, I think about Aunt Cathy, Aunt Sherry, Aunt Liz and my grandmother, MeMe. These women come from two different sides of my family; however, they all have one thing in common – breast cancer.

September 19, 2012

On Sept. 17, the Mississippi State Department of Health reported 29 new cases of West Nile virus, bringing the state’s yearly total to 169 cases and four deaths. The virus has spread across a large portion of the state, though no cases have been confirmed in Lafayette County.

August 24, 2012

Law enforcement agencies at many levels are cooperating in new efforts to keep legitimately prescribed drugs from ending up in the recreational drugs market.

Law enforcement agencies at many levels are cooperating in new efforts to keep legitimately prescribed drugs from ending up in the recreational drugs market. A program that allows Mississippi residents to turn in unused or unneeded prescription medication was the first of what officials hope to be a series of programs designed to reduce the availability of prescription drugs for illegal use, according to a recent press release.

July 11, 2012

Mississippi's only abortion clinic is safe for now, as U.S. District Judge Daniel P. Jordan III extended the temporary restraining order against a law that could shut it down.

 
Mississippi's only abortion clinic is safe for now, as U.S. District Judge Daniel P. Jordan III extended the temporary restraining order against a law that could shut it down.
House Bill 1390, which passed on April 4 and was to take effect on July 1, requires abortion providers to be certified OB-GYNs with admitting privileges at a local hospital.

July 10, 2012

 
Neck pain is a common, unpleasant sensations, and it’s becoming increasingly more common. Sometimes referred to as “tech neck,” a stiff, sore neck is often the result of hunching over a laptop or desktop computer for long periods of time. It can also occur if you’re like me and cradle your cell phone between your ear and shoulder. Other common causes are sleeping in an awkward position, frequently carrying a heavy bag on one shoulder or just bad posture.
 
There are a few things you can do to avoid this neck pain and/or to remedy it if you are already experiencing it.

 
Neck pain is a common, unpleasant sensations, and it’s becoming increasingly more common. Sometimes referred to as “tech neck,” a stiff, sore neck is often the result of hunching over a laptop or desktop computer for long periods of time. It can also occur if you’re like me and cradle your cell phone between your ear and shoulder. Other common causes are sleeping in an awkward position, frequently carrying a heavy bag on one shoulder or just bad posture.
 

July 10, 2012

West Nile Virus has not disappeared in the South, despite the low number of reported cases.

 
West Nile Virus has not disappeared in the South, despite the low number of reported cases.
The Mississippi State Department of Health (MSDH) reported three human cases of the West Nile Virus (WNV) this past week. The report was last updated July 3, and three different counties have been affected this year: Hancock, Lauderdale and Lincoln. Mosquitoes in Forrest, Lincoln, Rankin and Pike county tested positive for the virus as well.

May 3, 2012

As one of the most medically underserved states in the country, Mississippi has 8.3 doctors per 10,000 residents, compared to the national average of 12.8 physicians per 10,000 residents. It must add 1,330 primary care physicians to its health care system to meet the national average of doctor count per capita. 

 

As one of the most medically underserved states in the country, Mississippi has 8.3 doctors per 10,000 residents, compared to the national average of 12.8 physicians per 10,000 residents. It must add 1,330 primary care physicians to its health care system to meet the national average of doctor count per capita. 

April 29, 2012

As journalists, we have a duty to inform when writing about a topic, even when that topic seems impossible to mentally digest. Such was the case when I began to read about the latest ‘trend’ teenagers are participating in: drinking hand sanitizers to get the same buzz alcohol provides.

April 19, 2012

Some readers knew what would fill this space before I began writing this week. 

 

Some readers knew what would fill this space before I began writing this week. 

They knew — but how? Perhaps they possess clairvoyance; maybe they have been remotely viewing my writing process this week; or, and what is most likely, they were familiar enough with their surroundings to predict what a person like me living in a town like Oxford would say on a day like today.

April 17, 2012

Gov. Phil Bryant signed House Bill 1390 yesterday, requiring all physicians performing abortions in Mississippi to be board-certifited obstetrician-gynecologists and to have admitting privlieges at an area hospital. 

Gov. Phil Bryant signed House Bill 1390 yesterday, requiring all physicians performing abortions in Mississippi to be board-certifiied obstetrician-gynecologists and to have admitting priviliges at an area hospital. 

"Today you see the first step in a movement, I believe, to do what we campaigned on- to say we're going to try to end abortion in Mississippi," Bryant said.

April 10, 2012

Beer connoisseurs throughout the state can look forward to a whole new brigade of beer this summer. A new bill (SB 2878) was approved by Gov. Phil Bryant last Thursday that will allow the sale of beer containing more than 5 percent alcohol.

 

Beer connoisseurs throughout the state can look forward to a new brigade of beer this summer. 

A new bill (SB 2878) was approved by Gov. Phil Bryant this past Thursday that will allow the sale of beer containing more than 5 percent alcohol.

The bill will allow businesses to carry beer with a higher alcohol content than is normally found in craft beers. Mississippi has been one of the strictest states regarding beer laws.

April 9, 2012

In the face of sickness, they persevere. They are often told they may not live to see the next day, much less their child’s next birthday. Some are forced to quit school, and others, their jobs. They fear for their future and take each breath with pride and faith. Some surpass the challenges while others succumb.

In the face of sickness, they persevere. They are often told they may not live to see the next day, much less their child’s next birthday. Some are forced to quit school, and others, their jobs. They fear for their future and take each breath with pride and faith. Some surpass the challenges while others succumb.
But what do we do? Do we simply shed tears of sadness when one close to us dies, and do we look and say, “Thankfully, that’s not me” and continue with our daily lives?

April 4, 2012

Last month, Sgt. Robert Bales left his military base in the Kandahar province of Afghanistan and marched into a small town where he proceeded to open fire, killing nine children and eight adults. Today, he’s being charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder and is currently undergoing mental fitness evaluations while awaiting trial at Fort Leavenworth. If convicted, Bales would face the death penalty.

 

Last month, Sgt. Robert Bales left his military base in the Kandahar province of Afghanistan and marched into a small town where he proceeded to open fire, killing nine children and eight adults. Today, he’s being charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder and is currently undergoing mental fitness evaluations while awaiting trial at Fort Leavenworth. If convicted, Bales would face the death penalty.

March 27, 2012

Frequent blackout sufferers visit emergency rooms 70 percent more often than those who don’t, a new study shows.

 

Frequent blackout sufferers visit emergency rooms 70 percent more often than those who don’t, a new study shows. 

Student drinking has been a serious public health concern for years. Blacking out, or amnesia, is a frequent consequence of heavy alcohol consumption. More than 50 percent of students who drink report blackouts, according to the recent study conducted at the University of Wisconsin by Marlon Mundt and Larissa Zakletskaja. 

March 19, 2012

Mississippi is looking to improve the health of its residents, starting with the disease that claims more lives than cancer, traffic injuries, suicides and AIDS combined.

 

Mississippi is looking to improve the health of its residents, starting with the disease that claims more lives than cancer, traffic injuries, suicides and AIDS combined.

Recently, the state has been attempting to reduce the increasing number of heart-disease related deaths and the Mississippi Healthcare Alliance (MHCA) and the Mississippi State Department of Health are spearheading that goal. Together, the groups have implemented a plan of action called the ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction, or STEMI.