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June 4, 2012

 

Meet 17-year-old Erica Yeager, a self-described country girl from Waterford who enjoys fishing, riding four-wheelers and spending time with her family.

In October 2010, she was diagnosed with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria or PHN, a life-threatening blood disease known to lead to leukemia.  

Fast forward to today — after multiple rounds of chemotherapy and a grueling bone marrow transplant — doctors have now proclaimed Yeager a healthy teenager. After conquering a rare disease and completing a full year of recovery, how will she celebrate?

 

Meet 17-year-old Erica Yeager, a self-described country girl from Waterford who enjoys fishing, riding four-wheelers and spending time with her family.

In October 2010, she was diagnosed with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria or PHN, a life-threatening blood disease known to lead to leukemia.  

February 26, 2012

At the 2012 Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College Spring convocation, before public radio personality Garrison Keillor even took the stage, the packed crowd had reason to cheer for the two Barksdale Award winners.

 

At the 2012 Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College Spring convocation, before public radio personality Garrison Keillor even took the stage, the packed crowd had reason to cheer for the two Barksdale Award winners.

“The brightest stars have always been our students,” said University of Mississippi Chancellor Dan Jones.

Two honors students, Cara Thorne and Ena Wei, were presented with $5,000 awards to complete projects that combine personal meaning and global impact. 

February 26, 2012

At the 2012 Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College Spring convocation, before public radio personality Garrison Keillor even took the stage, the packed crowd had reason to cheer for the two Barksdale Award winners.

 

At the 2012 Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College Spring convocation, before public radio personality Garrison Keillor even took the stage, the packed crowd had reason to cheer for the two Barksdale Award winners.

“The brightest stars have always been our students,” said University of Mississippi Chancellor Dan Jones.

Two honors students, Cara Thorne and Ena Wei, were presented with $5,000 awards to complete projects that combine personal meaning and global impact. 

May 1, 2011

Researchers at the University of Mississippi are discovering new ways to lessen the side effects of drugs used in cancer treatment.

Researchers Dale Nagle, Yu-Dong Zhou and graduate student Sandipan Datta have been given a grant by the National Cancer Institute to study the effects levels of oxygen have in cancer cells and natural products that target tumor cells that are hypoxic, or have reduced oxygen.

Datta said that when a tumor occurs in the body, the cells divide very rapidly, which causes the tumor to grow larger.

May 1, 2011

Researchers at the University of Mississippi are discovering new ways to lessen the side effects of drugs used in cancer treatment.

Researchers Dale Nagle, Yu-Dong Zhou and graduate student Sandipan Datta have been given a grant by the National Cancer Institute to study the effects levels of oxygen have in cancer cells and natural products that target tumor cells that are hypoxic, or have reduced oxygen.

Datta said that when a tumor occurs in the body, the cells divide very rapidly, which causes the tumor to grow larger.